Jose Palomino

QT: Neuromarketing “Cut Products, Boost Sales”

August 5, 2010

Great move on Wal-mart and P&G’s part. Generally, it does make sense to only give customers a controlled amount of choices. I think that having too much of one thing has a tendency to overwhelm the senses. Giving customers too many options, in a sense, devalues what your selling. You remove a product’s distinctiveness by making it just part of a mass of other choices.
Of course, there should also be some exceptions to this. I guess, the “Purple Oreo Problem” is just similar to being served too much sushi or chocolate. A lot of us like them and there’s an unending variety to both. However, when these chocolates and sushi are laid right in front of you at your table, in all shapes and sizes and flavors, there’s no guarantee you’re going to eat everything. You can only take on so much. There comes a point when you just have to step back and say you’ve had enough.
Thanks for this highly interesting post, Roger! Looking forward to reading even more from you.

Original Post From: Neuromarketing “Cut Products, Boost Sales”

(June 1, 2010)
by: Roger Dooley
“I’ve written about some of the research that shows that shoppers don’t always respond positively to a bigger selection of products (see More Choices, Fewer Sales) and extreme product/brand proliferation (see Mega-Branding: The Purple Oreo Problem). Now, retailers are implementing the concept of reducing selection in their stores and finding that it can indeed increase sales.” (more…)

My Quick Take…

Great move on Wal-mart and P&G’s part. Generally, it does make sense to only give customers a controlled amount of choices. I think that having too much of one thing has a tendency to overwhelm the senses. Giving customers too many options, in a sense, devalues what your selling. You remove a product’s distinctiveness by making it just part of a mass of other choices.

Of course, there should also be some exceptions to this. I guess, the “Purple Oreo Problem” is just similar to being served too much sushi or chocolate. A lot of us like them and there’s an unending variety to both. However, when these chocolates and sushi are laid right in front of you at your table, in all shapes and sizes and flavors, there’s no guarantee you’re going to eat everything. You can only take on so much. There comes a point when you just have to step back and say you’ve had enough. Thanks for this highly interesting post, Roger! Looking forward to reading even more from you.

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