Jose Palomino

To get ready for my upcoming keynote talk at the MarketingSherpa Email Summit 2015 in Las Vegas, for each of the five weeks leading up to it, I’m be sharing a new tip with you to address one of five questions as a preview from my presentation on “The Value Prop Critical Path”. This week, we’ll talk about the competitive alignment of your offering.

strip mall competitive alignment

Image Credit: Jacob Norlund on Flickr

Why should your customers buy it from you? Do they know? And even more importantly – do you even know?

It’s About Competitive Alignment

I talk with my clients about differentiation often, and I tell them all the same thing – if you don’t have a clear idea of exactly how your offering is truly different, then your customers certainly don’t. Think about that: that means that out of every marketing dollar you spend, some of them are buying sales for your competitors.

Your competitive alignment is made up of the factors that set you apart from your competitors when your customer makes a buying decision. No matter what you’re offering, there is someone else out there who is selling something that could also solve your customer’s problem. You need to show your customer how your offering is different, and demonstrate that it is different in a way that is meaningful to them. Read More »

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To get ready for my upcoming keynote talk at the MarketingSherpa Email Summit 2015 in Las Vegas, for each of the five weeks leading up to it, I’m be sharing a new tip with you to address one of five questions as a preview from my presentation on “The Value Prop Critical Path”. This week, we’ll talk about the technical aspects of your offering.

Bose Beats Headphones Technical Specs

When you read “technical specs”, you’re picturing the bullet points on a plastic clip tag at Best Buy, right? You might not think your product or service offering has any technical specs. But from a value proposition point of view, we’re really just talking about the most basic W’s of what you’re selling. What is it? What does it do? How will buying it help me solve my problem?

You know that your new buyers are always coming to you from a place of doubt, and that your marketing needs to draw them in – while overcoming their obstacles before they’ve raised them. Let’s take a look at how two companies selling the same pair of headphones grabbed two totally different market shares. Read More »

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To get ready for my upcoming keynote talk at the MarketingSherpa’s Email Summit 2015 in Las Vegas, for the next five weeks I’ll be sharing a new tip with you to address one of five questions as a preview from my presentation on “The Value Prop Critical Path”. This week, we’ll talk about your product’s financial positioning.

cheap McDonalds burger cost option

Image Credit: pointnshoot on Flickr

Remember that for every large or complicated purchase, your buyer is always asking themselves five main questions. Your job is to provide the answers to overcome their unspoken objections and move from the default position of doubt to one of confidence. Your marketing platform should always address in the customer’s mind:

  1. Why should I deal with you?
  2. How will your offering affect us financially?
  3. How will we manage and absorb your offering?
  4. How does your offering compare to my alternatives?
  5. How can I safely “step into” your offering (without losing my shirt or my job)?

Today we’re going to focus on question number 2. Your customer wants to know the financial impact that your offering will have on their business– but don’t think you can just slap a price sticker on your product and call it a day. A price sticker, or even a thorough and well presented proposal, isn’t a conversation. This isn’t about the actual price itself, but about the buyer’s financial targets, thresholds and expectations for purchases. You need to talk to your buyer to understand those aspects of their position, and then work with them to get to the heart of why it is good business to select your offering. If we’re talking about cost, there are really only three positions that you can take. You can only ever approach your customer by presenting either the low cost option, product superiority, or customer intimacy. The key is to be clear in your own mind which market you are targeting. Read More »

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business alignment handshake

You already know that a tight value proposition has to elegantly convey the big idea behind your product or service – what makes what you’re selling so great? What makes it worth the money? But sophisticated buyers are also looking to answer five main questions for themselves before they’ll make a purchase decision with you Read More »

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Why You Should Go-to-Market the Same Way Apple Replaces an iPhone Battery

January 15, 2015

Image credit: Alper Çuğun on Flickr What Can Apple’s Retail Customer Service Experience Teach Us About Marketing? I found myself in an Apple store the other day to replace a phone battery for my wife. The Apple Associate told me that they would see me at 11:40, and the repairs would take 45 minutes provided […]

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Does your Cost Cutting Cut Out Customers?

October 17, 2014

Image credit: Mike Mozart on Flickr Like millions of Americans, Subway is an everyday lunch. Every month or so I drop a Subway for a reliable Italian sub – and there’s pet peeve I have with the many (haven’t tried them all) stores in the chain: napkin hoarding!

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A “Risky” Conversation

October 9, 2014

Image credit: Andy Chase on Flickr Through our extensive research and experience, we’ve come to narrow down the many conversations salespeople have in their sales cycle. It boils down to five pivotal conversations every salesperson needs in order to close a complex sales deal (there are sub-conversations for each, of course, but these capture the […]

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Is Your Offering Compatible with Your Customer?

October 2, 2014

Image credit: Willi Heidelbach on Flickr My client was selling floor tiles to a national retailer. Everything was in alignment as far as anyone could tell – and the retailer was thrilled that they would be saving thousands of dollars per store – and they had lots of stores. One day, the decision maker asked, […]

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